Maintenance Tips

It’s important to service your machine regularly. Here are a few maintenance points to help you optimise the life and reliability of your machine. If you are looking for more information on the matter, we invite you to contact us by visiting our Customer Support or our Customer Enquiry and Feedback pages.

GENERAL TIPS

How often should I service my lawn mower, tractor or garden equipment?
Most manufacturers recommend each piece of equipment to be serviced at least once a year.
All small engines use petroleum-based products. As the additives in the petroleum break down and the oil & fuel is left to settle over long periods of time, it can cause sludge and a gummy residue. This residue can cause engines to run rough and even sometimes not at all. Also, the sludge can block key lubricating points which can cause rapid and excessive wear. Eventually, the engine could become completely ruined.
What type of oil should I use in my small engine?
Not all motor oils are the same. Here is a simple explanation about oil. In warmer climates, most engines need thicker oil. In colder climates, most engines need thinner oil. Oil is measured by its thickness or “viscosity” (how fast if flows). For example, 40 weight oil is thicker than 30 weight oil. The “W” in “10W40” stands for winter, which means that in winter, this particular oil behaves like 40 weight. Using the wrong oil can cause difficult starting and poor gas consumption.
Always check the operator’s manual oil and fuel required for your unit.
How often should I sharpen my mowing blades?
Sharpening cycles depend on the conditions encountered by the mower. In sandy or very dry conditions, the blades may need sharpening every two to three hours. At a minimum, the blades should be checked and sharpened if necessary before each day of operation.
Keep an extra set of sharp blades handy to replace those that become dull or damaged during daily operation.
What type of oil should I use in the hydraulic system?
Any high-quality 15W-40 fully synthetic motor oil can be used.
How often should I check and service the hydraulic system?
Hydraulic oil should be checked daily. Make sure the top of the tank is clean BEFORE removing the fill cap. The hydraulic oil and filter should be changed every 500 hours. Instructions for the oil and filter change can be found in the operator’s manual.
How often should I grease, change oil, or otherwise service my mower?
Complete service instructions and service recommendations can be found in the operator’s manual.
How can I correct poor discharge or uneven cut?
Poor discharge is a factor of blade tip and ground travel speed. Always mow with the engine operating at full speed. Regulate operation control with ground speed. At high ground speeds, the blades cannot cut the grass efficiently. When grass is high, the ground speed must be slowed down.

Never cut more than 1/3 of the grass height. In high or lush grasses, the mower should be operated at its highest level of cut, and then re-cut at the final desired height of cut. Uneven cut can be something as simple as incorrect tire pressure. NOTE: Check the operator’s manual for correct tire pressure.

Poor discharge and uneven cut can also be caused by damaged, unbalanced, or dull blades. Grass build up under the deck can damage or wear the deck belt.

Check the operator’s manual on how to correctly set the cutting height of the deck.

Should I bag or mulch?

What’s the least favourite outdoor chore?

Survey says… Many people claim raking and clearing leaves is the job they dread the most. Since leaves just don’t vanish into thin air, you’re stuck with a few ways to clean up your yard during autumn.

Here’s a few suggestions that will help you easily decide whether to bag, mulch, or use the leaves for compost.

Benefits of Bagging

Lots of residential homeowners decide to bag their leaves. Here are some benefits of bagging:

Benefit 1:

Bagging leaves gives your lawn a fresh groomed look, instead of seeing piles and clusters of leaves spread across the grass.

Benefit 2:

Leaves can smother your lawn if enough of them build up, preventing sunlight from reaching the grass and increasing the chances of disease. Collecting the leaves in bags allows your lawn to breathe and receive proper sunlight.

Benefit 3:

Bagging is great when dealing with pine trees that leave lots of needle clumps on the grass. Pine needles are more difficult to mulch.

Benefit 4:

Many leaf bags are biodegradable, so they can decompose with the leaves.

Benefit 5:

Entertainment! With Halloween in October, some people like to use pumpkin designed leaf bags as decoration. Also, leaf-pile-jumping has continued to be a popular autumn all activity.

Why your lawn mower won't start?
Do you want to save a little time, money and frustration at the beginning of the season?

A little preparation will help you do all three. Proper small engine storage is essential for your equipment to operate correctly at the beginning of the season. Read below to find out what you need to do to properly store your lawn mower.

1. Proper Battery Storage:

Will the battery spin the engine?

Has it sat over the winter and now won’t turn?

A small inexpensive trickle charger can keep the battery fully charged and give your battery a longer life. In the fall you can plug it in and forget it until the spring. It is best to unhook the battery cables even if you don’t use a trickle charger. Some units have computers or other electrical items that put a small draw on the battery. The best you can do for the battery is to remove it from the unit, clean it, store it in a cool dry place, and then hook it up to a trickle charger.

2. Proper fuel Storage

When you parked the unit in storage did you treat the fuel with a good stabiliser?

Fuel purchased today has a 30-day shelf life. This is due to the mandates put on by the government that the fuel needs to be oxygenated. After the 30 days the aromatic parts of the fuel have evaporated enough to cause no starts, poor starts, poor performance, and could even cause engine damage. The base of the fuel that is left turns into gum and varnish that leaves deposits in the carburettor, plugging essential passages. It can also leave deposits on the intake valve stem, causing it to hang up and not close properly or even not to close at all. Fuel treatments such as stabilisers can help extend the useful life of fuel and prevent deposits in the engine parts.

3. Stroke Engines

Remember the fuel contains an oil mix. The fuel mixture will still deteriorate and cause no starts, poor starts, and even engine damage. If the fuel is not treated as above it can plug the small passages in the carburettor and necessitate its replacement. It will also deteriorate the fuel lines between the carburetor and the tank and even those within the tank.

A SPECIAL NOTE: Be sure to shake the storage can before you refuel your equipment. The oil can settle out and you will fill the tank with straight fuel!

How to Extend Fuel Storage Life:

If you have fuel 30 days old or older discard it, there is no way to renew it. You can extend its life just after you buy it by adding a good stabiliser. This will greatly extend its storage life.

Why am I replacing belts every year?
First you should not be having to replace belts every year or more in one year. Below are some tips on things to look for before replacing that third belt this season.

Common Problems
• The most common problem with deck belts is excessive grass clipping on the deck. Grass clipping can work there way under pulleys and deck covers which can lead to more serious problems. Make sure to clean off your deck after every use following the manufacturers recommendations.
• Here a big problem that is missed a lot. You know that guard around that pulley that makes it a pain to take off the belt every time! Well that guard is very essential in keeping the belt in place. Missing belt guards will cause the belt to fly off.
• Last but not least pulleys can cause big problems. Check pulleys for wear and worn out bearings. If in doubt replace the pulley. Always remember to shut the unit off before attempting any maintenance on the unit. This brings us into the other problem “broken belts”.
Admon receives many calls each day for replacement belts issues, when a customer tells us this belt is the second one this season being replaced this sends up flags.

The biggest culprit here is bad pulleys. Check the belt for uneven wear or excessive wear. A pulley rides on bearings that allows it to spin freely. When that pulley does not spin freely friction starts between the pulley and the belt. You guessed it, another broken belt. Remember belts do wear out but if you are replacing the same belt more than you should than fix the problem not the symptom.

HEDGE TRIMMER

Daily Routines
Clean the outside of the machine.

Make sure the throttle trigger is locked and the throttle functions correctly.

Check that the stop switch functions.

Check that the blades do not rotate while idling or when the choke is in the start position.

Clean the air filter. Replace if necessary.

Check that the hand guard is not damaged. Replace the guard if damaged.

Check that all nuts and screws are tightened.

Check that there are no fuel leaks.

Weekly Routines
Check the starter, the starter cord and the return spring.

Make sure that the vibration-damping elements are not damaged.

Clean the outside of the spark plug. Remove and check the electrode gap. Adjust the gap to 0.5 mm (0.020″) or change the spark plug.

Clean the cooling fins on the flywheel.

Clean or replace the muffler’s spark arrest screen (not on mufflers with a catalytic converter).

Clean the carburettor area.

Clean the cooling fins on the cylinder and check that the air intake in the starter unit is not blocked.

Fill the gearbox with grease. This should be carried out after approximately every 20 working hours.

Check that the bolts keeping the blades together are tightened.

Monthly Routines
Clean the fuel tank.

Clean the carburettor and the area surrounding it.

Clean the fan wheel and the area around it.

Check the fuel filter and the fuel pipe, replace if necessary.

Check all cables and connections.

Check the clutch, clutch springs and the clutch drum with regard to wear. Replace if necessary.

Change the spark plug.

Check and clean the muffler’s spark arrest screen if necessary (only mufflers with a catalytic converter).

TRIMMER

Daily Routines
Clean the outside of the machine.

Make sure the harness is not damaged.

Make sure the throttle trigger lock and the throttle function correctly from a safety point of view.

Check that the stop switch functions.

Check that the cutting head does not rotate while idling.

Clean the air filter. Replace if necessary.

Check that the guard is undamaged and not cracked. Replace the guard if it has been exposed to impact or is cracked.

Check that the blade is well centred, sharp, and is not cracked. An unscented blade causes vibrations that can result in damage to the machine.

Check that the trimmer head is undamaged and not cracked. Replace the trimmer head if necessary.

Check that the locking nut is tight.

Check that the blade’s transport guard is intact and that it can be secured correctly.

Check that all nuts and screws are tightened.

Weekly Routines
Check the starter, the starter cord and the return spring.

Make sure that the vibration damping elements are not damaged.

Clean the outside of the spark plug. Remove and check the electrode gap. Adjust the gap to 0.5 mm or change the spark plug.

Clean the cooling fins on the flywheel.

Clean or replace the muffler’s spark arrest screen (not on mufflers with a catalytic converter).

Clean the carburettor area

Clean the cooling fins on the cylinder and check that the air intake in the starter unit is not blocked.

Check that the angel gear is 3/4 filled with grease, fill if necessary using special grease

Monthly Routines
Clean the fuel tank.

Clean the carburettor and the area surrounding it.

Clean the fan and the area around it.

Check the fuel filter and the fuel pipe, replace if necessary.

Check all cables and connections.

Check the clutch, clutch springs and the clutch drum with regard to wear. Replace if necessary.

LEAF BLOWER

Daily Routines
Clean the exterior surfaces of the blower.

Check the throttle lock and the throttle trigger function in a safe manner.

Check that the stop switch works properly.

Clean or replace the air filter.

Make sure all nuts and screws are properly tightened.

Check that all the housings are free of cracks.

Check that the collection bag is intact and that the zipper works.

Weekly Routines
Check the condition of the starter device, the starter cord, and the tensioning spring.

Check that none of the anti-vibration mountings are damaged.

Check the condition of the air intake at the starter device. Remove debris if it’s clogged.

Clean the outside of the spark plug. Unscrew it and check the electrode gap. Replace if needed

Clean the fan blades on the flywheel.

Clean or replace the muffler’s spark arrest screen (not on mufflers with a catalytic converter).

Clean the carburettor space.

Clean the air filter

Monthly Routines

Flush the fuel tank of old gasoline. Refill with fresh gasoline and add a fuel stabiliser.

Clean the outside of the carburettor and the space around it.

Clean the fan blades on the flywheel.

Check the fuel filter and the fuel line. Replace them if necessary.

Check all the cables and the connections.

Change the spark plug if needed.

Check and clean the muffler’s spark arrest screen if necessary (only on mufflers with a catalytic converter).


Conclusion: Performing these maintenance routines will keep your equipments in top shape and prevent damage from happening. Keeping to a maintenance routine will not only save you in the long run but it will keep your equipments ready for anytime you may need them.

Admon’s Safety Tips: Before servicing or repairing any power equipment, disconnect the spark plug and battery cables. Remember to wear appropriate safety glasses and gloves to protect against harmful chemicals and debris. View our Disclaimer.